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Day: February 18, 2024

There is an anecdote early on in Gods and Kings, veteran fashion journalist Dana Thomas’s rigorous dual biography of John Galliano and Lee Alexander McQueen, that makes me laugh. Thomas interviews a fashion writer, Lisa Young, who recalls sitting next to a young Galliano at a London dinner in the eighties. The designer was hailed as brilliant straight out of Central St. Martins, but his first collections had issues with fit. So, “we got to talking about tits, as you do,” says Young.

“You don’t like them much, do you?” she asked Galliano. “He looked a little sheepish, and then whispered: ‘No. They spoil the line.’”

Galliano, who went on to design those famed bias-cut gowns that swirl around curves like wet meringue, clearly got over this particular point of distaste. And then came his instant classic Maison Margiela Artisanal show last week, in which, among other countless moments of glory, tits—and hips, and even pubic hair (they were merkins, but still)—were on full display. The female body, exaggerated to beyond-Jessica Rabbit, beyond-Kardashian proportions with hip padding and corsetry, was presented as dramatic, luxurious, and even a little frightening. And in a first for Galliano, and an extreme rarity for couture, a significant portion of those models were not straight size. Sumptuous flesh for sumptuous clothes.

This beautiful couture collection, nearly a year in the making, is deservedly everywhere, a moment of cultural domination not seen in fashion in recent memory, if ever (monoculture is dead, except for this). We are all waxing rhapsodically about Pat McGrath’s makeup and Pat Boguslawski’s choreography and the decadent set and the clothes—the jaw dropping clothes, which Galliano invented several new techniques to construct. The clear points of inspiration—Brassaï, the photographer who documented seedy Parisian nightlife in the 1920s and 30s, whom

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 Charlotte Tilbury.

Charlotte Tilbury.

Charlotte Tilbury is making old Hollywood new again—while still retaining everything we love about the era, of course.

On Tuesday, January 23, the brand is launching a collection of brand-new lipstick and liner colors, marking the first-ever lip range in their beloved Hollywood franchise. Falling into three categories—the matte Hollywood Reds lipsticks, the satin Hollywood Pinks lipsticks, and the matching Lip Cheat lip liners—the products boast vintage glam colors paired with fan-favorite formulas that could only be of this decade.

“Darlings, my NEW! Hollywood Beauty Icon Lipsticks are the Hollywood secret to INSTANT STAR CONFIDENCE!!!” wrote makeup artist Charlotte Tilbury via Instagram, sharing a campaign starring Kate Moss and Jourdan Dunn. “I have decoded the perfect nuanced pinks and reds to suit EVERY complexion!!!”

Charlotte Tilbury

Charlotte Tilbury

To kick things off, the Reds will be available in five shades, all featuring the brand’s award-winning Matte Revolution formula.

“It’s designed for every woman, of all ages and any skin tone, offering a buildable, transfer-proof, long-lasting, matte color with up to 10-hour wear,” reads a press release shared with Marie Claire. “Inspired by the glamorous, old Hollywood lights, the 3D-effect red pigments architect the lips, creating the ultimate lip shape for the special Hollywood moment in your life.”

Another five lipsticks come in shades of pink, ranging from the soft-mauve “Red Carpet Pink” to the candy-colored “90s Pink.” These new offerings feature the brand’s soft, satin-y, and shiny K.I.S.S.I.N.G formula, which offers a “full and luminous look.”

Last (but certainly not least), the Lip Cheat lip liners will also be available in five new shades (“Icon Baby,” “90s Pink,” “The Queen,” “Mark of a Kiss,” and “Red Carpet Red”), echoing both reds and pinks from the collection. Infused with jojoba seed oil, the waterproof liners promise both 24-hour hydration

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