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Tag: louis vuitton

Hollywood star Cate Blanchett said that her custom made dress for the award event BAFTAs was made out of deadstock. Deadstock are items that have never been sold and are unlikely to be sold due to a lack of demand.

At the event, the actress was seen dressed in a high-necked crepe-jersey claret dress teamed with a gem-encrusted choker and there was a strong message of sustainability in the creation.

Nicolas Ghesquiere used the fashion house’s existing stock to create the gown, which took 150 hours, while Francesca Amfitheatrof, Louis Vuitton’s artistic director of watches and jewellery, rearranged gems from older collections, including pearls previously worn by Cate to last year’s BAFTAs, in a process described as “creative circularity.”

In a conversation with Vogue Magazine, Cate said that “deadstock is not a sexy word.”

She added: “But Nicolas used it to make a strong, sexy dress, and Francesca has brought her artistry to the fore yet again to rearrange and redesign a spectacular piece of body jewellery. I’m in awe of them both and relish collaborating with them at Louis Vuitton.”

The 54-year-old actress, who has worked in films such as ‘Tar’, ‘Carol’, ‘Thor: Ragnarok’ and ‘Ocean’s 8’ among many others, says she likes finding “creative ways” to be more sustainable with her red carpet wear.

Cate added, “I love the next, the new, but I also relish the opportunity to rework, reflect, and bring the best of the past into the present. There are no single fixes to tackling anthropogenic climate change, but finding creative ways to tackle (the culture of) excess in the fashion industry, and the pressures it places on our climate, is imperative.”

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The new Louis Vuitton GO -14 bag combines three things that are vital to one another: a designer’s inspiration, a trunkmaker’s thriving heritage, and an artisan’s ingenuity, presented with the house’s magnificent savoir-faire.

Meet the GO-14 bag, the symbol of timeless creativity passionately created by Louis Vuitton’s artistic director, Nicolas Ghesquière. The bag originally appeared on the designer’s first runway show for women’s collection in October 2014, hence the name – Ghesquière October 2014. Nine years on, the bag re-emerges to meet today’s aesthetic with its distinctive design and details crafted by the house’s skilful artisans. Of particular note is the crisscross pattern that instantly steals a glance.

Named the malletage, Ghesquière revives its inspiration from the interior of Louis Vuitton’s trunks, purposely designed to keep documents in place. Despite imagining its practical function, he rediscovered the pattern as the bag’s striking yet discerning feature. “There are some universal codes that exist solely in Louis Vuitton. It was about reappropriating and transposing them into a new setting,” says the designer on his unparalleled discovery.

As a testament to the house’s trunk-making heritage, the malletage poses a challenge for all the artisans in the atelier. The creative process itself requires more than 20 different steps, particularly to get the perfect and subtle gradations on the patina. The steps also ensure it can get a satin or toasted finish near the stitching. Adding more attention to detail to the bag is the high technique the artisans put through for depositing the 17-metre-long trim for the rounded malletage, making the process a true epitome of the maison’s complex savoir-faire.

The newly reimagined GO-14 bag also boasts its cushiony and curvy look using the soft lambskin. And like its original idea, the pattern is padded and overstitched to highlight the bag’s surface. Additionally, the

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November is when the Cruise fashion collections begin to hit stores. Also labelled as Resort, Holiday or Pre-Spring, they comprise of versatile clothing pieces designed for those who travel to escape winter in the Northern Hemisphere.

That said, they can work for other occasions too – like year-end festive parties or, if you already live in a warmer country, beach getaways.

For this year, the exciting offerings bridge the gap between feminine chic and whimsical edginess.

Destination dressing is the usual theme. After all, fashion houses stage shows in exotic locations around the world to debut their Cruise collections.

For example, Dior presented its designs in Mexico City back in May. The weeks after that saw Gucci flying into Seoul to do the same, while Carolina Herrera chose Rio De Janeiro and Max Mara picked Stockholm.

The list is endless, as every brand wanted to create a spectacle with their Cruise collection runway show.

To really stand out for the Cruise season, you need to literally shine. Photo: Carolina HerreraTo really stand out for the Cruise season, you need to literally shine. Photo: Carolina HerreraTrends for the season are also as varied as the jet-set destinations – just pick one that can suit your personality, or go by whatever specific reasons you are dressing up for.

Read more: When they go short, we go long? Maxi skirts are fashion’s latest trend

Positively sweet

The Barbie film really revived the appeal of pink. This is apparent on runways, where the sweet colour stood out.

Chanel’s Cruise collection featured several all–pink outfits. Whether in the form of two-piece suits or maxis dresses, as well as easy-to-wear separates, the models looked very pretty in variations of the shade.

Dior also included several hot pink looks for the season. This very vibrant bubble-gum hue stood out among the more demure outfits – especially since the runway show took

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Pharrell Williams has <a href=recording studio in his clothes design hub to keep him inspired: ‘I go back and forth all day!’” width=”1200″ height=”630″ data-lazy-srcset=”https://static-koimoi.akamaized.net/wp-content/new-galleries/2023/08/pharrell-williams-has-recording-studio-in-his-clothes-design-hub-to-keep-him-inspired-i-go-back-and-forth-all-day-001.jpg 1200w, https://static-koimoi.akamaized.net/wp-content/new-galleries/2023/08/pharrell-williams-has-recording-studio-in-his-clothes-design-hub-to-keep-him-inspired-i-go-back-and-forth-all-day-001-300×158.jpg 300w, https://static-koimoi.akamaized.net/wp-content/new-galleries/2023/08/pharrell-williams-has-recording-studio-in-his-clothes-design-hub-to-keep-him-inspired-i-go-back-and-forth-all-day-001-560×294.jpg 560w, https://static-koimoi.akamaized.net/wp-content/new-galleries/2023/08/pharrell-williams-has-recording-studio-in-his-clothes-design-hub-to-keep-him-inspired-i-go-back-and-forth-all-day-001-150×79.jpg 150w, https://static-koimoi.akamaized.net/wp-content/new-galleries/2023/08/pharrell-williams-has-recording-studio-in-his-clothes-design-hub-to-keep-him-inspired-i-go-back-and-forth-all-day-001-768×403.jpg 768w, https://static-koimoi.akamaized.net/wp-content/new-galleries/2023/08/pharrell-williams-has-recording-studio-in-his-clothes-design-hub-to-keep-him-inspired-i-go-back-and-forth-all-day-001-696×365.jpg 696w, https://static-koimoi.akamaized.net/wp-content/new-galleries/2023/08/pharrell-williams-has-recording-studio-in-his-clothes-design-hub-to-keep-him-inspired-i-go-back-and-forth-all-day-001-1068×561.jpg 1068w, https://static-koimoi.akamaized.net/wp-content/new-galleries/2023/08/pharrell-williams-has-recording-studio-in-his-clothes-design-hub-to-keep-him-inspired-i-go-back-and-forth-all-day-001-800×420.jpg 800w” data-lazy-sizes=”(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px” data-lazy-src=”https://static-koimoi.akamaized.net/wp-content/new-galleries/2023/08/pharrell-williams-has-recording-studio-in-his-clothes-design-hub-to-keep-him-inspired-i-go-back-and-forth-all-day-001.jpg”/
Pharrell Williams has recording studio in his clothes design hub to keep him inspired: ‘I go back and forth all day!’ ( Photo Credit – Facebook )

Pharrell Williams has a recording studio in his clothes design hub to keep him inspired. The 50-year-old rapper debuted his first collection for Louis Vuitton in June after being appointed the brand’s creative director of menswear, by turning Paris’ oldest bridge the Pont Neuf into a catwalk during this year’s Paris Fashion Week.

Pharrell told The New York Times Style Magazine about how he constantly flits between his music and clothes design: “Being a producer and a creative director are similar. I can go from apparel to drums, from trunks to melodies.

“Within my design studio, I have a section allocated to music, so I go back and forth all day.” He added about his Louis Vuitton appointment: “It’s like I’m a perpetual student. If I’m the king of anything, it’s the king of being a pupil… being surrounded by so many talented people is the best,” Pharrell Williams said.

“I mean, I’m an Aries, so I’ve always been super impulsive. But without the resources and the people, I’d be just like every other person with a great idea.”

Pharrell Williams said about where he draws his inspiration from for designs and

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PARIS – Fresh off his victory at Wimbledon, tennis player Carlo Alcaraz is serving up his first campaign world-number-one-tennis-player-carlos-alcaraz-brand-ambassador-1235715136/” data-ylk=”slk:as a Louis Vuitton ambassador;elm:context_link;itc:0″ class=”link “as a Louis Vuitton ambassador.

Breaking Friday on Vuitton’s digital channels, the campaign sees the Spanish wunderkind in athletic poses — here a serve, there a forehand follow-through — while wearing tailored clothing and evening attire.

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It’s an opportunity for the French luxury brand to speak to a sports-loving audience — and to remind consumers that its fashion offer extends to timeless business wear, modern tailoring and tuxedos, some with tonal jacquard thistle motifs.

The majority of fashion brands highlight runway designs in advertising campaigns, while Vuitton communicates on an array of product lines. This time its more formal men’s wardrobe for spring-summer 2024 gets the spotlight.

Photographer Dan Jackson captured Alcaraz at the Hôtel de Maisons, the 18th-century mansion on the Rue de l’Université in Paris that the late designer Karl Lagerfeld called home for more than 30 years.

A 21-page look book, dispatched with the press release about the Alcaraz campaign, depicts models in the same Rococo rooms as Alcaraz, but captured by photographer Thomas Lohr in static poses, and toting a range of leather goods, including portfolios, briefcases and backpacks.

“As an athlete, it is not every day we get to dress up, but there are special occasions and it feels good to show up looking and feeling great,” Alcaraz told WWD. “I think as I have grown up, I definitely have more appreciation for a well-tailored suit.”

The sportsman called working with a brand like Vuitton a “dream come true,” with the Jackson photo shoot a highlight so far.

Carlos Alcaraz strikes an athletic pose in the new <a href="https://wwd.com/fashion-news/fashion-trends/mens-fall-2023-trends-1235778919/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Louis Vuitton;elm:context_link;itc:0" class="link ">Louis Vuitton</a> campaign.
Carlos Alcaraz strikes an athletic pose in the new Louis Vuitton campaign.

Of all

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September is the biggest month of the year for fashion – its host to fashion weeks in New York, London, Milan and Paris, and traditionally time for the most impactful magazine covers.

This is historically when fashion magazines dive into the autumn/winter trends – with big celebrity names and accompanying interviews to help.

September issues are so important, in fact, a documentary was made about Vogue’s journey to print in 2007 – aptly named The September Issue.

With a host of celebrity names and extraordinary fashion shoots, these are the most glamorous September covers…

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Euphoria actor Zendaya is on the cover for Elle’s USA magazine, wearing a racy black mini dress studded with holes. The outfit is by Louis Vuitton, a brand the star is now an ambassador of.

Zendaya was pictured at the dramatic Ace Hotel in Downtown Los Angeles, which was a theatre in the 1920s before later being used as a church, then becoming a hotel.

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Model Cara Delevingne was tapped to cover Elle’s UK magazine, wearing an edgy Dior outfit of a black cropped cardigan, a translucent skirt and combat boots.

In the accompanying interview, she spoke about the relationships she has made in the fashion industry when starting out as a model. “Me, Jourdan [Dunn] and Karlie [Kloss] were thick

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September is the biggest month of the year for fashion – it’s host to fashion weeks in New York, London, Milan and Paris, and traditionally time for the most impactful magazine covers.

This is historically when fashion magazines dive into the autumn/winter trends – with big celebrity names and accompanying interviews to help.

September issues are so important, in fact, a documentary was made about Vogue’s journey to print in 2007 – aptly named ‘The September Issue’.

With a host of celebrity names and extraordinary fashion shoots, these are the most glamorous September covers…

Euphoria actor Zendaya is on the cover for Elle’s USA magazine, wearing a racy black mini dress studded with holes. The outfit is by Louis Vuitton, a brand the star is now an ambassador of.

Zendaya was pictured at the dramatic Ace Hotel in Downtown Los Angeles, which was a theatre in the 1920s before later being used as a church, then becoming a hotel.

Model Cara Delevingne was tapped to cover Elle’s UK magazine, wearing an edgy Dior outfit of a black cropped cardigan, a translucent skirt and combat boots.

In the accompanying interview, she spoke about the relationships she has made in the fashion industry when starting out as a model. “Me, Jourdan [Dunn] and Karlie [Kloss] were thick as thieves,” she said – adding designers such as Olivier Rousteing, creative director of Balmain, “have been so much more than work friends, and have taught me a lot about living”.

One of the biggest covers of the month is the long-awaited reunion of the original ‘supers’: Naomi Campbell, Cindy Crawford, Linda Evangelista and Christy Turlington.

The quartet – who rose to fame as the biggest names in fashion in the Eighties and Nineties – reunited for this joint cover with British and American Vogue,

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Pharrell inspired by a recording studio in his clothes design space
Pharrell Williams (Photo credit: Bang Media)

Pharrell Williams has a recording studio in his clothes design hub to keep him inspired.

The 50-year-old rapper debuted his first collection for Louis Vuitton in June after being appointed the brand’s creative director of menswear, by turning Paris’ oldest bridge, the Pont Neuf, into a catwalk during this year’s Paris Fashion Week.

He told The New York Times Style Magazine about how he constantly flits between his music and clothes design: “Being a producer and a creative director are similar. I can go from apparel to drums, from trunks to melodies. Within my design studio, I have a section allocated to music, so I go back and forth all day.”

He added about his Louis Vuitton appointment: “It’s like I’m a perpetual student. If I’m the king of anything, it’s the king of being a pupil… being surrounded by so many talented people is the best. I mean, I’m an Aries, so I’ve always been super impulsive. But without the resources and the people, I’d be just like every other person with a great idea.”

He said about where he draws his inspiration from for designs and music: “Japan is my favorite place. On my 50th orbit, I had a birthday party organized by Nigo [the Tokyo-based artistic director of Kenzo and hip-hop producer]. One of the most amazing gifts is his presence in my life. Twenty years ago, I needed to go to Japan to record something, so Nigo arranged for me to come to his studio, which is basically a compound on five floors of a building. One floor is a showroom, one is a photo studio, another is a recording studio, and I was like, ‘Wow, this guy lives what’s in his head.’ That changed me. I was so used

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Her approach is based in her long history of thrifting, but also in Seattle’s vibrant sustainable-clothing scene. Brands like Girlfriend Collective and Prairie Underground, vintage stores like Indian Summer and Bon Voyage, and designers like Janelle Abbott are among the locals mindfully pushing the dial forward on what sustainable clothing can look like.

In mcLean’s case, that look might be anything from a bucket hat made from a Burberry scarf to patchworked hoodies to hand-dyed denim shorts.

“Seattle is going to be a big place for sustainable fashion,” mcLean declares. Despite our city getting forever blasted for being a paragon of anti-fashion, she believes our penchant for eco-conscious fashion is what makes us unique. “We don’t even second-guess being sustainable, it’s just the way we are,” she says.

Similarly, mcLean’s “bootleg” series brings DIY flair to discarded high-fashion items. She started bootlegging in high school when she flipped a thrifted Juicy Couture keychain into a necklace. Now, mcLean reworks luxury dust bags and metal label emblems from houses like Louis Vuitton, Fendi, Prada and Gucci into necklaces, underwear, bikinis and earrings. 

It’s a practice distinct from duping or knocking off a luxury brand — one closer to “fan art,” mcLean says. Drawing from the long tradition of streetwear-turned-luxury designer Dapper Dan (“My biggest bootleg idol,” says this dan), whose unsanctioned flips of Gucci and Louis Vuitton prints launched him to fame, mcLean sees her remixed items as a tip of the hat to luxury brands.

“It’s not ripping off somebody’s design, but more like, I respect you and I see you and I see that you do these cool things and I wanna be like you but I don’t wanna be you,” explains mcLean. (Her website includes a lengthy disclaimer stating all her designs are “repurposed,

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The confluence of art and fashion at the Met Gala and elsewhere has far-reaching ramifications. Each field has begun to see itself anew. Art, having never achieved such mass relevance, wonders whether it might descend from its ivory tower and become genuinely popular. Fashion, unused to such high-culture cred, wonders if it might win new seriousness and cachet in the public eye. Inspired by these potentials, each side turns more ardently to the promise implicit in the other.

This cross-pollination has a long history. At the dawn of the 20th century, Paul Poiret, “the king of fashion,” enlisted artists to create his textile patterns, fashion illustrations and business stationery. Elsa Schiaparelli collaborated with Salvador Dalí on several iconic designs, including the “shoe hat” and “lobster dress” of 1937. Christian Dior ran an art gallery before becoming a fashion designer and later named his dresses “Matisse,” “Braque,” “Dalí” and “Picasso.”

But in recent years the reciprocity between of art and fashion has become big business. Fashion houses now look to transcend their narrow identification with clothing and accessories. Louis Vuitton, according to Bernard Arnault, the C.E.O. and chairman of the fashion and luxury goods conglomerate LVMH, which owns the brand, is “much more than a fashion brand. It’s a cultural brand with a global audience.” By emphasizing its links to art — and, by implication, art’s rarity and exclusivity — Louis Vuitton symbolically undercuts the reality that its business imperative (to sell more goods) effectively decreases the rarity and exclusivity of its products. The company made $20 billion in sales last year, doubling its revenue from four years prior. But as a “cultural brand,” Louis Vuitton dissolves the crass reality of products and sales in the mythic allure of storytelling and image.

Art institutions have come to

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